5 Tips to Finding a Locksmith You Can Trust

When dealing with an emergency like getting locked out of your home, you simply don’t have time to search for the best locksmith. While I’ve used this argument for building a team of contractors so you’re prepared for emergencies, my list has never included a locksmith. I knew it was important to share these tips on finding a locksmith you can trust. That’s because home security is a key element of home safety.

PS Thought it was fun showing a door with an old fashion, skeleton key lock.

Finding a Locksmith Tip #1: Timing

Your home is your castle and you want to protect it. A good time to find a locksmith is right after you buy your home. Changing your locks is the only way you know that others don’t have keys to your home. You’re already researching other contractors for your home management team, so add a locksmith to your list.

Alternatively, you might switch to one of the new smart locks, that lets you track everyone entering your home. Before you buy your smart lock, consider all the other smart products you’ll be buying. You want smart products that work together, or connect through a common Internet hub.

Finding a Locksmith Tip #2: Verify the Business

Once you’ve found a locksmith, research the business online. Confirm they’re using a local address (Google maps will show you what it looks like). Check their online reviews. Call them outside normal working hours to insure they’ve got phone coverage for emergencies.

When talking to the office, ask questions about their process. How does their pricing work? Will they give you a rough estimates over the phone? Are their locksmiths licensed? Will they give you the name of the locksmith being sent to your home?

Finding a Locksmith Tip #3: Ask for Identification

When the locksmith arrives at your home, the most important thing to do is check their identification. All licensed locksmiths have a Master Security License Number. This number should be displayed on their vehicle and their photo identity card. If they say they’re licensed but don’t have their card, I’d suggest sending them on their way.

Finding a Locksmith Tip #4: Get a Written Estimate

After the locksmith has reviewed the situation, they should be able to give you a written estimate. That’s how my handyman business worked. First we’d build a list of projects over the phone. Then we’d estimate how much time everything would take, which allowed us to give a rough estimate. After our handyman technicians reviewed the work, they’d confirm or adjust the estimate.

Before you decide to replace your own door lock, consider the cost of the tools and hardware, in addition to your time. Locksmith estimates may include the following:

Service fees including transportation and additional charges for emergency service outside normal business hours. My handyman business charged a flat “trip fee” that covered our time to drive to/from the job site.

Hardware fees if a lock has to be replaced (lock and strike plate) or re-keyed. According to Improvement.com “If a locksmith tells you the locking mechanism needs to be replaced, you may want to get a second opinion.”

Make sure you have an opportunity to review, approve and sign-off on the estimate before work starts. This will help avoid questions at the end of the job.

Finding a Locksmith Tip #5: Pay via Credit Card

All legitimate businesses today take credit cards. It’s the safest way to pay because you’re protected against fraud. Never pay cash as there’s no way to trace it, and no recourse. And with today’s smart phones, there are lots of devices like the “Square” that enable payments through the phone (shown above).

Original Article Here: 5 Tips to Finding a Locksmith You Can Trust

Related Article Here: How to Find a Good Locksmith

Are you in doubt of other locksmith services around you? Looking for a reliable and affordable locksmith service? Don’t hesitate to contact Locksmith Vinings GA and you will find your satisfaction in their services!

Keyless entry for cars – what you need to know

Keyless entry – it’s all the rage. Why even my Renault has it. And you can see why it’s proving popular as you rarely have to get the key (if it should still be called a key) out of your pocket or bag and the car just unlocks, starts, drives and locks again after.

But is there a downside? Yes, in a word – security. For example, devices are available that boost the signal between the car and fob that can then mean the car thinks the owner is within proximity and allows the doors to be opened, belongings to be removed and potentially for the car to be started and driven away aka stolen.

This seems to be what happened to a colleague of mine. His brand new E-Class was parked outside a restaurant with the fob inside about 10 yards away from the car which should mean it’s out of range. The car was taken without any fuss or commotion. It appears that some security function did kick as the car was later found in a nearby car park, apparently having gone into limp home mode but it could easily have been put on a truck never to be seen again.

Fortunately, the insurance companies don’t seem to be treating these vehicles as higher risk and therefore there’s no current impact on premiums but a flood of claims could easily change this status.

There’s another potential issue when a car is shared by two or more drivers. Another friend of mine was test driving a BMW for a few days. On one of the days her other half drove initially and then she took over the driving, leaving him at home. The engine wasn’t stopped as he got out and she moved seats. You can probably guess where this is going. A straightforward drive to Meadowhall was followed by a straightforward bit of retail therapy followed by returning to a locked car that wouldn’t have started even if the doors had managed to be opened. The fob had to be brought to the car in another vehicle. Fortunately it wasn’t late at night and the car was in a safe place but it could have been very different.

What can you do to avoid such problems?

To avoid unwanted entry and theft, there may be a few options. With my car, if I lock it using the physical button on the fob, it has to be unlocked by pressing the other fob button which gets round the unwanted third party entry problem. But I forget to do this and other brands may work differently. I’m told that wrapping the key in aluminium foil blocks the signal and this could be an option if you have a spare key at home that rarely used but it’s hardly a solution for the main fob. You can also buy RFID blocking bags or cases quite cheaply but this also means you effectively have to stop using the keyless element as you’ll have to take the key out of the wrapper to either press the button or for the vehicle to pick up the signal.

I’m not sure what the short term answer is to completing a journey without the key that started the engine other than both drivers constantly carrying their keys but that’s not the solution if there are 3 or more drivers as cars tend to come with two keys only. Maybe we just have to remember to leave the key when swapping drivers but it’s not exactly foolproof.

Long term though the onus is on the manufacturers to beef up the security or ditch the technology. It could be simple improvements like the ability to switch off keyless entry or constant warnings if the key leaves the car whilst the engine is on. Tracker technology that kicks in if the car or van is driven without the key wouldn’t prevent theft but would facilitate recovery. Whilst most cars don’t have trackers fitted, factory fitted satnav which is fairly standard now does provide the basic technology. Perhaps the answer will be something such as fingerprint or retina identification of authorized drivers with the system reset every time the driver’s seat is vacated.

Original Article Here: Keyless entry for cars – what you need to know

Related Video Here: Keyless Entry

If you are looking for a help regarding with your keyless entry for your cars, contact Locksmith Vinings GA anytime!